Netsmart CareThreads
Netsmart CareThreads

Episode · 11 months ago

6. #Seniorliving Redefining the Expectations of Aging

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

With more than 10,000 Americans turning 65 each day, the Baby Boomers are about to make their mark on the post acute industry. How will they shape what the future of our industry looks like? 

  

In this episode of NetSmart CareThreads, Doug Leidig, president and CEO of Asbury Communities, joined Jeremy Mercer, director of post acute community strategy for Netsmart.  

  

Jeremy and Doug discussed: 

  

- Why it's important to redefine the expectations of aging 

  

- How technology will help redefine aging 

  

- Why we need to reshape the post acute industry 

  

- Managing change as the industry repositions itself for a new perspective on aging 

  

If you want to hear more episodes like this one, look for the Netsmart CareThreads podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify or Stitcher.

Welcome in that smart care, threads, apodcast for Human Services and postocute leaders across the healthcarecontinuum come together to discuss industry trends, challenges andopportunities. Listen is we uncover real stories about how to innovate andimprove the quality of care for the communities we serve? Let's get intothe show. My name is Jeremy Merser and I your host today, I serve as directorof postcte community strategy for Netsmark. I'm excited about our gueststoday. Do Liig from asburry communities. The topic for today's episode is onredefining the expectations of AG with more than ten thousand Americans turnit sixty five each day. The baby boomers are about to make their mark onthe post cute industry as they look for a new aging experience and will help toshape what the future of our industry looks like. Let's go ahead and getstarted, Dobe, please hare a little bit about yourself and Asbury communities.WEL! Fine! Thank you. Thank you very much for including men. Today's podcast,it's always exciting. Just to talk about our industry and the future andthe world of possibilities. My name is douglaghticome. COF has bre communitieshave been CEO for about six years now been with Asbry for twenty years, indmultiple, multiple positions, I've actually been in the field for thirty enears, starting out at sixteen. When Iwas a nursing assistant, so I've I've seen a lot of changes in the industry,which is excited me even more about the future and the possibilities asrecommunity was found ID one thousand nine hundred and twenty six. Wecurrently serve over forty five hundred old adults, and we have twenty eighthundred associates for the Seveneenh Largust, not for profit senior livingorganization based on the Zegular top two hundred and our business linesincludes the CCRCS and it company homecare home health, with a recentaffiliation with all bright. We now have a pharmacey and a pace and we haveseveral had communities as well, so we operate eight communities in threestates. So it's a little bit about who we are very good, and I would say youknow, in the twenty years that you've been part of Asbury sounds like there'sbeen a lot of change. We have we'we've grown, we've started new business lines,we've had some successevs we've had some failures, we've had some start tostop. So yes, it's it's been a constant evolution which I think has really beenexciting, O D and Why we have actually a lot of longevity and our organizationbeyond myself. Absolutely that evolution is a, I think, a key point tothis industry and probably feeds into the topic of today really well- and youknow, I'm curious, why do you think it's so important to redefine theexpectations of Agen sure? I think that you know there's probably two mainreasons. One is I'm convinced it. That is the only way. True healthcare reformwill work. I think senior living needs to be viewed as an asset in health care,re, forman and often times. frwhere e were the afterthought and I think wehave a tremendous amount of opportunity...

...and expertise and assistance to bringto the process. So that's one and then two is just for the survival of ourindustry. You know often you hear people say you know. We hear peopleview that is the old folks home or that's. You know where you go for thelast stages of life and we have come such a long ways, an industry with thatand that's not who we are. You know we're a lifestyle. We offer lots oflifestyle, lots of opportunities and it's fewed. Much more is the nextchapter in people's lives, not as the last chapter- and you know.Unfortunately, you saw portraye that way through Covid I mean the there aresome bad apples, unfortunately, and and that was sort of the what people viewright, but yet, at the same time, when you look at our industry, the successstories and the and the the residents who lived in our campus didn't have togo through as much isolation as people independent of themselves. So there'sso much good work being done and it's evolving that we need to change thatway, because you know I'll even go back to when I was in college n in the earlys you K W my undergrad degrees in long term, car administration and peoplelook at me like well. Why do you want to do that? That's what retiredministers did right, but I knew there was so much more excitement andopportunity in the field. So that's where, where I'm at, but in order forthat to happen, there's so many things we have to do is an industry. I meanwe're not there yet, but we have to start taking on that mindset absolutelywell, and you know to your point around the true healthcare reform and kind ofhow the industries viewed the kind of navy convention around post. Acte meansthat you know. Inevitably there is an acute care of stay and the reality isthat everything that most providers are working towards is all to prevent that.So you know it seems like by definition, perhaps the industry set up, as I wouldn't say, an afterthought, butnot as a preventative part of healthcare you're exactly right, andthen, when you you couple that with what the boomers are going to be, youknow the boomers are going to be something unlike this industry hasnever had. We typically with the with you know the greatest generation, theGI generation. You could put them all in a box and they had four fivecharacteristics: that sort of defined them very well. These boomers are goingto be all over the place. I mean everything from you know the wealtha're going to have there's a lot that have a lot of wealth, there's a lotthat won't have a lot of wealth, there's going to be a group that haveembraced wellness and that heav'n embraced wellness, there's going to bea group that has o k, ow your typical family structure and then you're goingto have the new family structure, N and dynamics and people that want to livein one place, but want to travel. I mean so. I think that that's going tocreate lots of opportunities, but a lot of challenges, and that's when I talkabout changing the wayt sside of huse aging. That's what I'm talking about.You know we're not going a able to serve all but as a collective, we canreally need a lot of needs and it's going to be a challenge force.Absolutely well- and you know the traditional CCRC or Lifelan communitymodels has felt like it's been catered towards. Let's say the higherend of the income population and you...

...know there's a lot of talk around thismiddle market which may or may not have the means to really Joini. You know thetraditional likeplaing community model, so I do you see that as kind of one ofthe fundamental shifs in the industry of you know changing the expectationsof how you serve the boomers absolutely, and that goes to the whole aspect- thatthere's going to be that large middle market income level, and it's reallyinteresting when you, when you say middle market or lower middle whateverthe word you want to use the definition of that is so vast. I mean you havesome that Veu that, as you know, some people make less than twentyhsand ayear, but others that make less than seventy five. And so you know. What'sthat really mean is how is going to be just as critical in the in the futureAndi success of it as possible, and I think there's no reason thatorganizations can have multiple levels, sort of a you think of a Mariad or aHilton. You know they had different brands. Everything from the rith downto you know courtyard, to there's no reason we can't do the same thing andstill serve more as part of our missions as 'n offer profits. So Ithink that's the mentality and thought process we have. Is We don't? We can olong o do the cookie cutter. We have to create inters opportunities to do that,you can do t very successfully, but you have to diversify. You know one of oneof the things that have come out of this in terms of you know as you stepback and look at covid and t en what is forced us to do. I'm convinced and I'mleaving as right now how that we're becoming at the verst fight, agientservices organization, it's no longer just CCRCS, it's the home care of thehomehealth, the pharmacies, these other opportunities that we can help servemore, and maybe you know we don't have a CCRC product. That's lower income,maybe ut, but we serve a greater community ewith these other to eaceother services. So that's where I'm thinking and collaborating with othersto do that is going to be critical for this absolutely well, and you know youtouched a little bit about covid and kind of the perception tha. You knowthe the media has created around. You know the I would say more residentialpart of you know, postcute care. You know how is Asbury been impacted byCOVID. I think you know very typical toeverybody else. You know but- and it impacted us to the point where itactually galphanized us as an organization because it was, it- wassort of the common enemy. If you will so so, we rallied our resources bothlocally and it s at the system level to help fight this to because our job wasto assure a safe living environment for the residents and a safe workingenvironment forour associates. So I think that you know one of the thingsthat we realized during this process is we didn't realize how many distractionswe had from our day today, job and when you stop all that, when that justabruptly stops and everybody's focused on on making sure that we provide thosethe safe living environment, you step back and say: okay, so coming out ofthis. What do we do differently right? Do don't drump drop back in the oldhabits and how much better were we? How much more agile did we become how muchbest this is riking, so we were really...

...impacted, but but it was impacted in agreat way that we're spending time looking out and say:okay, so w? What do we keep going? You know what good habit should we pick upand let's do that in what can we stop and make sure it doesn't come back inabsolutely well, and you know you kind of think about redefining theexpectations. I think part of you know what you're saying is you'V got tolearn from this and use that as a way to rebuild confidence among what yourtarget resident or you know. Member would be because you know the media,like we mentioned, has kind of put a negative side on it and it sounds likeyou're using what you've done as a way to say: Hey Look, we are, you knowactually very safe, and these are all the ways that we changed to be betterfor you know our residents or staff etc. Absolutely, and it's a great story totell and again as an industry, we don't tell our story well enough right andthat's that's on us. We need to do that better and we have a lot of goodstories to come out of this. But to your point of saying you know: Well, welearned that we could be more agual. We learned hat, we could stop a lot ofdistraction, but it emphasized a lot of things we were doing well, for instance,you know the technology, you know we have our own technology, copmy whell.We were able to say: okay, let's reassess our strategic plan for our itcompaan really focuse on that infrastructure, and then we startedsaying: okay. Well, we've talked about data, but let's really go from data toAi, and let's get smarter about that. So so we've been able to redirect someof our our initial strategyc planning, because covid truly is a strategic.It's a strategic, pland alteration right, so we have to do things a littledifferently and n were really leveraging that and so not only fromthe technology from the way we work, but also the way we communicate and theway we can enhance the lives of residents and, I think, there's twocamps that come a that have come out of covid with with our industry, one whoabsolutely have bouht into this right. So they say: okay, it's a safe place. Ihave friends that lived in a community. Isolation wasn't really an issuebecause they had you know their neighbors and they were like minded, sothey could they could get together and and it outside or different differentopportunities. But there's also the group that says look. I am never goingto go into ECIMA Communi, because I don't want large areas just verysimilar. We you hear people moving out of the city, so I don't want to be inthat. So I want to be isolated, so there's going to be two camps, but wecan serve and help both and how do we? How do we do that in order o theopportunitie? So there's a lot of things that have happened just when youstep back and start really looking at it and say: Okay, what did this presentto us? Because I think there's lots of opportunities now coming out of thisand have you found that your team or your staff has been really receptive toyou know using technology? Oh absolutely, you know the fortunate partis: We've been working with technology for a while and we've been pilotings ofrobots. We've been polotig some different things, so it creates thatthirst and definitely through this...

...process, the other one that reallyhelped us with the technologies. You know we and the Covid as we realizedhow important communication is not only for our residents, but we set up amicrosite on our website and we ended up having, I think over thirty twohousand page visits and we were very transparent with our data daily. Weupdated covid desk covid cases residents associates, but we also knewthat about two years ago we had a group say: Look, we sent out a lot ofcommunication, but we have a lot of associates who don't have email everyday, so they came up and we had a like an innovation. It's called was calledsparktank. It was a little fun event that the resie that the associate said,let's partner with what was called Ridiab and now people are associates,can download ready, APP and instantly. We have communication wit an so ifthey're sitting at home and an email comes out about an update about Covid,they could access righter o their own phone. Its an open shift came up. Nolonger do we have the nursing people having to call people say: I've got aopen shift, they put it out in readyap and you can hi. You can go ahead andclick on it. From from your home, our associated APP went from, and I justhad some statistics. I think I heard it was like eighty seven percent of ourassociates Hav now download that APP wow. So that's that's pretty tremendouswhen, but it's also the realizations, like you, didn't realize how manypeople you were missing, eetially because it a something hung up at theat the time, clock or along those lines. H So yeah we've learned a lot and andthen and then Tou the email, an the Microsoft or the microste. We went fromnormally emailing two hundred nineteen family members who have signed up towell over three Thousano and now one o daily or weekly basis for emailing andtouching and communicating so much better. I think that's helping us tellour story, that's helping to say you know elimin lot of rumors, as also asfor answer a lot of questions. For sure I mean it sounds like it's reallybringing the team together. Rebuilding confidence, especially in these tryingtimes and now are you feeling that the the resident had really bought intokind of the the model you guys are setting up? And you know how has e theresonant experience evolved because of you know Covid, and you know how howyour organization is responding and that's that's a good question andit really depends on the level of care I mean so if you're independent livingat first, they were all in on this and they were like the temperature checksin the screening and leaning, but once the you know, because we were operatingin three states, we had you know when covid first came out, you know everystate every county was different, so we were able to sit through a lote at thesystem level. So we were trying to operate these different states, but theresidence Hon e, independent Livingwere- very they embraced it. But when thegovernors or the local authority started opening up the local community,we were still pretty. You know restrictive in terms of just protectingthe resident. So then it was starting a pushback like El. Why? Why can myfriend who lives in his own house go...

...golfing? But yet I start to go thrilglthese check in check out thanks for that. So we learned a lot. You knowthat we couldn't for the first two months. We did everything fromassystant perspective, no matter what level, but then we started breaking itinto the different levels of care, nursing, home resence. To be honestwith you, I'm still very concerned about, in terms of just as an industry,there's still a lot of isolation, Ghor Iknow we're still pretty restrictive inthe states and their, and you know we had the flu season and everything elsecoming up. There is a it's a mental toll on our resience in our in ourskill, nursing facilities and communities, and so we have to do a lotto make sure that we address isolation and we're trying to do eveything. Wecan and that's where the robus come in, that's where you know the facetimingand the interactions and trying to create a create the safe you huggingstations and things like that. The longer this continues to go onthere, there's more more risk of that absolutely well. I've been probablyyou're all social media for quite a while, and I've noticed that you guyshave really stepped up. You know your staff has really leaged into Po tocreate that engagement in times of isolation and- and you know how hasthat been felt and received by your residente- it's a family. I think ourindustry in general, when you, when you have a community, it's around family,because everybody does become very attached to each other. So there werenot decisions being made that were for any other reason, but for eitherpromoting that safeliving environment or promoting that safeworkingenvironment and and everybody really just embraced and got behind that- andthere were a lot of you know, obviously story after story of associats goingabove and beyon residents giving back. You know they were just as involved, I'm just asproud of them. As anything is saying: Hey we understand people leavng theirfamilies to come. Hure take care of us we're going to give back. So it'sreally heartwarming. It tells a great story an and that's the good stuff thatone fortunately just gets. You know pushed aside when, when you talk aboutthe news for sure, well, those don't make as as great as headlines as youknow some of the alternatives, but yeah I mean you can tell the the authenticand genuine happiness of both the staff and the residencs. You know wheneveryou see the photos that are out there and you know it's truly being felt andappreciated, or at least you can see it in what you guys are putting out there.So you know thanks, F R, for all you guys do in terms of making sure thatyour residents and your staff are filling appreciated, and you knowgetting that time, because we know isolation can be, have really negative effects oneveryone. They really can. So as we look out back at kind of the thebroader topic of you know, redefining the expectations of aging. You know wekind of talk about a little bit about you, know the industry and how it needsto lean in on kind of what this new modelthe boomers are going to be pushing is. But what part do you see, technologyplaying and redefining that experience?...

It's a key part in every differentlevel. I you know we're trying to learn in I'm a big proponent of WSTUDYING,others that aren't in our industry right N, and I think you know howpeople contact with their and connect with their consumer and their customers.How do they do that? How can we bring that in? And it is all aroundtechnology now virtual? You know the I think we're doing a lot with a lot ofpeople are doing with the virtual tours going to specific rooms and giving thevirtual tour somebody that's a very interested in one. We can W we'reLeverai talogy that way, communication the zoom working differently. You know,I I don't think we're doing anything that is different than anybody else isdoing in terms of the global economic environment, but we're learning fromothers and how to do that, and that's where the data, the Ai, you know theconstant communication surveying. What can I do better asking the questions Ihave found that technology has enabled us to do that so much more. Obviouslyit and en doing more micro surveys and and saying then we're also levagingtechnology for the CLEANIN perspective. You know, we've invested a lot in Youvilighting and we've invested. You know the from the communication tools andthe the ninety eight point. Six is that new temperature thing, where it'sfacial recognition, because you know we had O, had two or three staff, usuallyScanni riwo into he- we're doing that all electronically. Now so we have likemaybe one person and and that's we're using that on robus, we have a temyrobot, that's going out and being able to do and interact with residents, sowe're doing a lot of things with technology in terms of the wholecommunication. Interaction is really where we're focused on and then, ofcourse, there's a t there's a part of us that focus on the data and heresults in the outcomes and how that is looking so tella health is obviously abig one as well, and we've realized recognize the opportunity to go beyondjust the doctor call of like you, K, ow, face to face doctor temperaturebloodscreening, we're really getting into you, know, wound care or system.So how do we leverage and but the infrastructure, the IT infrastructure,is another step beyond what you have today. So we're really going all in onon Telethisin UNTILA health in terms of wound care and much more cute care andthan connecting that with the hospitals yea. I think that's where we're reallyputting sort of our it on some steroids and energizing a lot of a lot of extracapital dollars, as well as as human resources to make that happen for sure.Well- and you know it sounds like your approach- is really looking attechnology, not as a burden but an Annabler for your team, and you knowall of these things seem like it would bring more satisfaction, maybe to theend user, by removing processes or steps, or you know, standing in onespot, taking temperatures all deay right exactly and if, if it creates adifferent experience for people right and we can make it a little bit morefun or a little bit less comversome- and I think you know when I talk aboutreally look at other industries and how they're doing it. You know we're alsolooking at our STRATEGYC business partners, and we were very cautious ofusing that term that it's very...

...important. So, for instance, we have agreat relationship with Ed Exele, but it's beyond they're, not just a foodcompany or O Mik maintenance or housekeeping t e laundry they're,really a partner, and we do fleet management. Do Electric work with them,but you know their global company. They were in China. They helped build thathospital was built in like twenty somen days. They saw first hand, so webrought hem to the table right away and they could give us sort of o heads upand say here's what it's comming, here's, what we're seeing and here'sand then also here's what they're doing so we coul help love reach, do do astep up when you talk about the reopening thw is a great partner ofargain or global. Well, they brought that to the table. You know we have youguys at Netsmar, which is which is a huge opportunity and partnership aswell in terms of the standardization of VHR and my unity and and getting to theKpis about how we're going things es a system. So we're really leveraging itto be get better not just to do today, but we're trying to say what can we doto get better and I think that's the the exciting part of what we do withtechnology yeah, it's beyond just the some of the fun things that you hearyeah absolutely well, and you have a history of helping to drive innovationin the in the space as well. Can you speak about why, as very specifically use, you knowhelping to grow technology as part of your strategy, and you know why youthink that's going to help reshape the industry sure one its because we havethe infrastructure and when I became CEO, you know we had this it companythat was sorted, doing ehrs and doing some Basi stuff, but I think every one of us would alwaysread you could read any article and look at the bigger world say:Technology is the future, so I'm like we've had a. We have an asset thatwe've been investing in for like five or ten years. So how do we reallyredefine that and then how does that help us and the balance we had tocreate and where I think this is hat will really help? If you have to I struggle and I'm as open and talkingabout my failures is Itthas to, I think that's important for all of us to do.You know I was really driving innovation and I was working. I waspushing hard and wanting to do that, but what I realized after about two twoor three years of really just having some starts and stops, is that wedidn't have the right infrastructure with it, because we had people thatcouldn't access, thourh email or we had people that couldn't you know, do somebasic things so they're like. If I can't do this, why am I going to getexcited about innovation, so we step back o make sure we spend a year reallyjust fixing our infrastructure moving to the cloud part ring with with youall and others, Jus say: Let'let's, let's bring everybody in. Let's getthis grounded and then we can start thinking and then that has to be drivenby the end user, not by somebody like myself or some other thing, a greatarticle. You read, you have to talk to those closer to the process which I'm afirm believer of. I think it's my background that growing ups as NursingAssistant. They know how to change the...

...business the best so we're sayingallright. What do you have? What do you? What are your payin points and how canwe help fix them and we can bring solutions to them, and then we createthis. This excitement around it, which then helps them create a differentexperience with helps change their belief yeah. So that's that's where Isee technology is a huge role because, but you have to start so fundamentallythis so fundamental and hi step want, and so many times a lot of us like toget to step five, six or seven right and my Blesson learnd is out of this.Is You can't you got to start with the basics and build on that? Absolutelywell. You know from my experience on the vendor side, you know a lot oftimes. I see organizations get really excited about. You know new technology,new capabilities and they to your pointng run straight to the inpart ofthe process. And then you know they'll bold on you know some new fancy pieceof you know technology, but they don't think about the workflow that they'reattaching it to so you know you're trying to enhance the workflow, not atanother step to you know. Ideally, it would remove, but people often don'ttake the time to stop and say: Hey, wait, a minute. If we now have thiscapability shouldn't, we not have to do you know all that other stuff, it'sexactly right exactly and then you're also collecting more data. So now we'resaying: Okay well, EV DAK! Now I have so much data and- and now the importantpart is with the datapart of this and ais, saying that's so much what I wantand we've got all this day, we'rl going to the an swe. What can we do to helpyou make your decisions o? You know what what piecees hit sow. Then wefocus the data and the KPIS toward that and we're doing it again very similarto what we're doing on with you all with in terms of looking at our orderentry we've got these Kpis of how we used to do it, and I know with some ofthe regine this technology and creating that platform. Now we're monitoring.You know the order entries Ti idmissions assessments to care planningthe bad passes, all these different things, and now we have something tomeasure yea ow. We can use that and put that in to hands of those close to theprocess and give them data and Heo. Okay, you know, makes sense now sorighthat's, that's how we're going to start changing things, but again it's goingto start fundamental, very fundamental yeah and you know in terms of kind of achange management perspective. You know people are going to be resistant untilyou give them kind of the o. What that's in it for them right, exactlyright, yea changed! You got to change your experiences, an n order, changeyour beliefs, absolutely, and you know it's very clear to me that yourorganization is both being pushed top down with you know. Priority of youknow Levregy technology, but it also sounds like you're getting bottom up aswell by including your team in the process. Absolutely absolutely that'sjust so critical and that's what I think that then lends yourself and whenyou look at, if you want to do rue, caus and Alse, I think why we've beenso successful through this Covid, because we've built these team. Thisteam concept this this this system concept. You know, fifteen years ago wewere individual communities and individual states. We've come a longway and we so a long way to go but...

...we're starting to think of a systemstarting to leverage their system and and put, but we're doing it from theground though, and we're not forcing it we're letting letting that just sort ofhappen, and some of it has to happen organically and some of it I would loveto have happened faster same time. I've learned enough here then realize that Isome of these thins you just have to let it sort of grow in its owwn pace,wile encouraging and supporting absolutely yeah, an the you know. Thethe teams are already probably stressed enough. You know in the day today, andyou know the complexities of Covin trying to to spren in terms of change.My scare, a lot of people exactly t you know, associate engagementwe're big onmeasuring that scores, and you know we just the thirditle bragging Ar wa intothirty an row greatest places to work ser you ow acertification through Covid,and I think that says a lot about the leadership and all the associates. Butjust as important as you associatete engagement is the resident engagementand a lot of times. That's we're taking at to different levels. So as anexample, sometimes we engage resents for some surveys and feedback, but whenwe're making decisions now, especially with trying to reopen we're, saying:okay, dining, here's how we do, but we've learned some unintendedconsequences when you, when you, when you ask the residence here's, whatwe're going to do and just a real quick example is, youknow we said: Okay, two couples considered a table together. The one ofthese communities said. But what has happened? Is the Widows said well ten?I can't meet with my friends who are married couples bcause, I'm and it'slike. Oh okay. So, let's step back and reassessso you know it's, you have to bring everybody to thetable to really help make some of these decisions, because there are these- andI think, we've gotten a lot morter about that and I think, will help us inthe long run and one of those things we continue yeah. Well, that's a greatexample of you know, making a decision init kind of in a vacuum, and then youknow learning as you deploy it. Do you do you have like committee or a group of residents thathelps drive some of the decision process or you know, involve them indpart of the innovation or technology discussions. EA Youra communities havea have a resident association and then there's also different theyr call them like Pax Partnership,Advisory Counsels and a different task force that they lettra that are beingdriven now out of the committee. So the resident committees we're looking ATSan interesting vo because we're looking at creating a system resident council,potentially that I have you, know a resident from each campus and then meetup here at our system level or some things along thoose lines, but we'renot there yet. But that's sort of there's definitely ways for us to bemuch much more aggressive and proactive interms of resident engagement at a system level. Yeah, and do you find awillingness from the AE? KIPAG yeah? Oh yes, yeah! There's, never any problem,you know getting feedback or asking for volunteers and- and I think that's agreat opportunity to- because that's a va as living in one of our communitiesright. You O have that opportunity...

...continue to give an and input, and wewant that to happen, and we just it's own us to create more appeness for thatto be much more of a regular daily business for sure well, and it makes itto less like its transactional. More. Like a you know, a partnership betweenyou and your residence. That's good way to put it absene and then you know kindof using that as a segue point. How are you using or how do you aview yourbusiness partnerships as a way to help propel? You know the shift inredefining you know the expectations of aging. I know you you touched on a few,but I be curious about you know how you see that as a strategy moving forwardthe way I do it, I we ask because I think it's very typical to if you wantto stay in the technology analogy. Most of US use the software at what sixtypercent of its capability and we don't even exploring. I think we do the samething with our business partners, whoare, sort of task, oriented andfocused on here some things hat. We bring the meetings together. I've beenvery purposeful that when I talk about the stratetiy fusness or I bring themto the round of the table and say here's my tratetic plan, you knowhere's where I want to go. How can you help me? What am I not hearing, andwhat am I not seeing? What can you bring to the table, but it's also theother side of saying what do you want to do and how can we do want to do itlike? You want to pilot something you want to try to see if it's, if it maybehas a different use in senior living? Well, then war open our doors to you aswell, and if you want to pilot it, we want to try that so creating thatcollaboration of partnerships with those I think it's just so critical andthe next step of all. This is identifying people who are not at thetable and who haven't been thinking of Sen your living and getting theminvolved, which is always a struggle, the googles, a microsofcs O or a othercompanies that talk about it and sort of. But you know how do we become thatpartner that they want to say, Hey, we'll, try this and he see if it doesHa, is applica poto senior living. So I think, there's lots of ways. We can dothat a lot better and you know we're being very open and transparent aboutwhere we want to go. Who we are and what we want to do and- and we pick ourbusiness partners to that with that in mind, yeah and do you find overall? Youknow, I assume your existing business partners are probably really receptive,but when you're out there on maybe t the bleeding edge o pulling in you know,some close tie. Type of you know vendors,that, U you you look because I think, like as an example, you guys pilotedthe pepper, robot right and you know, explored his functionalities in thespace, and you know I'm sure that was learning when Hes promiint, but wasthat a hard conversation to bring to them to say, Hey, we've got a thought.You know it. Actually it wasn't because it was hard at fight. It was very openeasy for us to say we got an idea but itw's hard for them to get to say yeahall right. Her senior living will try that, because a lot of again goes goingback to earlier conversation, a lot of people, don't think about senior livinguore an afterthought, and that's where...

...we have to do things better thindustry.If people will see us as innovators as great care management or or looking todo new things, then that story 's going to get out, but one two three of uscan't do it o t by ourselves and that's why I appreciate these podcast thatyou're putting on ind others, because it's helping us tell our story thatmaybe somebody else will hear it. Sav are people ater thinking differently.Let's think about that, because, as you said, ten hosand a day right, I meanit's going to get bigger and bigger and thee gointo be a world of opportunitythere and we're all there's plenty of opten for all of us to get into thisand figure this out. Absolutely so I think for my final question for you andit's kind of a great followup to your statement there. What advice would yougive others in the industry who support the fundamental change, but maybearen't on the edge of really pushing to you know drive whether it's you knownew models for their their staff. You know engaging the residence in a newway or maybe they're doing all of those things, but they've been thinking aboutan idea to go and pursue. You know some new company to come into the space tomeet an e. What would you tell him? I would say: Don't let what others thingsstop you because I think that's a lot of people to Al people say whether it'sthe person you want to talk to or whether it's, how is viewed that look.You know people are like pepper all right, so it didn't work. The way weDan. That's as much on you know. Maybe us as it is the pepper o wer wereexpectations were embrace that and learn from it, but you're going to haveto try and you're going to have to fail. I think that's the biggest step isdon't be afraid of failure, and that in our industry is just such a Tabout,taboo topic that you have to embrace that and because then that's whatpeople start seeing you're trying things a lot of people know aboutpepper. So now they're like so now we have the temy ro, but now we have otheropportunities, so I would say you know, try it pilot it, but you have to getsupport of your internal team to do it, because if it's just your idea, it'snot going to work because you don't have others that have boht into it, andI have learned that time and time again they can't just be me. It's got to beeverybody and they have to embraceon and understand. To your point,understand the why yeah very good? Well, I can't thank youenough for taking the time to chat with me today. Thank you for sharing yourpassion, giving the examples of how you and asburyare really moving these typesof models forward, and you know thank you for leading by example the Redivine,the aging experience and you know, thinks again to your staff to you andeverything you guys do to serve the senior living population. I know it'sbeen a trying time and you guys have done an amazing job under thecircumstances. So thank you again, O good. Thank you for the opportunity. Iappreciate you doing these podcast because I think it's going to helpeverybody as a whole, so it's been fune. Absolutely. Thank you at that. SMART.We understand the challenges facing provider organizations. Our team willhelp you navigate changing value, based care models with solutions and servicesthat make person centered care or...

...reality will equip you with technologyand services that provide holistic, real time. Views of Care Histories thatinform better decision making and better outcomes visit us today, anntstcom Netsmart serving you, so you can serve others thanks for listeningto the Netsmart Care, threads podcast through collaboration and conversation,we can work together to make healthcare more connected than ever before andbetter support the communities we serve to ensure you never miss an episode.Please subscribe to the show in your favorite podcast player, if you useapple, podcast, we'd love for you to give us a quick rating for the show.Just have the number of stars that you think the podcast deserves until nexttime.

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